Detecting Audio Source Of Music File

yogi

no fate but what we make
[OP]
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Aug 26, 2005
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Sometimes I download wave files for music from p2p networks, but how can I be sure whether this is actually a wave file, and not a lossy conversion from some mp3 or other similar lossy format???If there is a method or a tool to detect this, please reply here!:)
 

waterloo_sunset

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Aug 26, 2005
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Try listening to it! MP3's converted to WAV sound horrible (much much worse than if the mp3's itself were played back....don't ask me why) and you'll easily be able to tell the difference if you hear them on good speakers.
 

seshu

Listener
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Mar 31, 2006
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1. check the properties of the wav file . Audio Format in details tab gives the quality of a wav file .

2. use a utility like AVIcodec & drag wav files into it to check the quality .
 


yogi

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@waterlooBut I dont have very good speakers because I dont own a music system...So I cant try what you said. @seshuavicodec gives detailled information, especially the codecs needed to play the file, and where to download those codecs if they are missing on your system. It does not say anything about the quality. While the properties of the wave file plays no role in detecting the source.I hope someone will have a reply soon....
 

yogi

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@mario_aI dont want to identify any file - I want to check whether the wave file is indeed a wave file, or it has been converted to a wave file from an mp3. I think there should be some kind of a spectrum analyzer to watch the low frequencies which wont exist if the source is an mp3.Maybe I should delete this thread...seems like a waste of time. Because I dont think there is any concrete way to do such detection. And I just dance to the music, I never listen to it...so it should not make any difference haha. Once upon a time, I had a dream of buying a good Bose system...but now I dont want it anymore. Thanks for the replies, I think we should end this thread :D
 


blr_p

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May 26, 2005
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QUOTE(yogi @ May 27 2006, 05:13 PM) [snapback]52463[/snapback]
@mario_a

I dont want to identify any file - I want to check whether the wave file is indeed a wave file, or it has been converted to a wave file from an mp3. I think there should be some kind of a spectrum analyzer to watch the low frequencies which wont exist if the source is an mp3.
[/b]
I would look towards the high end frequencies actually since thats one of the few areas what mp3 optimises, in other words it removes frequences that the human hear would not normally percieve, if you dont see stuff after 18khz range chances are it may derive from an mp3. But this is highly dependent on what kind of music you listen to also the year the music came out. Reasons being a lot of pop music is compressed to sound louder on el cheapo systems as some marketing exec thinks they will sell better that way. This reduces the frequency spectrum somewhat compared to older recordings pre-90s for example. You would need to rip a CD for the smae label form approximately the same epoch in time and compare your known wav to the one you downloaded to get any idea whether its compressed or not and even then it would be 50-50.

Bottom line, get your stuff from trustworthy sources :)

Tools to do this, steinberg's wavlab is one, but that ain't free. Maybe cooledit or audacity have frequency analysis spectrum displays.
 

yogi

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oh yes, Audacity! I forgot about it. I have it on the computer somewhere. Its a good tool! :)
 

Mark0

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Jun 28, 2006
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QUOTE(yogi @ May 27 2006, 05:13 PM) [snapback]52463[/snapback]
I dont want to identify any file - I want to check whether the wave file is indeed a wave file, or it has been converted to a wave file from an mp3. I think there should be some kind of a spectrum analyzer to watch the low frequencies which wont exist if the source is an mp3.
[/b]
Check Tau Analyzer version 1.2 from http://www.true-audio.com/.
It's a tool designed for this kind of jobs. Obviosly results can't be always 100% correct and have to be taken as highly educated guesses.

Bye!
 

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