BSNL business broadband urgent advice please

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techiedoc

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I have relocated from the UK recently and am completely new to the Indian broadband scene. I am looking to have a WiFi router connection for one of the BSNL Business plans. What does single user and multiuser mean on the tariff plans? Do the single user plans allow use of a router? In other words, do I have to take the multiuser plan to be able to use a router? When they speak of SU/MU, are they talking about simultaneous use of the braodband connection or just multiple accounts? Many thanks in adavnce.
 
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appus

The Real
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BSNL Broadband -Home 500C
I have relocated from the UK recently and am completely new to the Indian broadband scene. I am looking to have a WiFi router connection for one of the BSNL Business plans. What does single user and multiuser mean on the tariff plans? Do the single user plans allow use of a router? In other words, do I have to take the multiuser plan to be able to use a router? When they speak of SU/MU, are they talking about simultaneous use of the braodband connection or just multiple accounts? Many thanks in adavnce.

You can use wireless router for all connections... they themselves provide the wifi router/modem along with the connection (as i am in home 750UL+)

you get info of business plans here

Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd.

Multi User and single user difference may be with contention ratio !

What I could gather so far is that Multiuser ADSL conections have better contention ratio. Contention means that the connection from your local exchange to the ISP is shared by other users. It is quoted as a ratio e.g 50:1 - meaning a maximum of 50 people will be sharing your allocated bandwidth (e.g. 512kbps). In actuallity the number of people sharing bandwidth is more complex it tends to be more like 3400 512kbps users sharing a 34Mbps connection, which means that a few users running at full speed have less of an affect on other users. In case of Multiuser connection, contention ratio is like 20:1. It is not necessary that such connections have multiple IPs. It depends on the agreement with the provider and they may charge more for giving multiple IPs. In case there is multiple IP (also called Multi-NAT) this is what I found -

\"In the most common situation, NAT is used to translate from a single public IP address to multiple internal private IP addresses; we call that one-to-many NAT (one public IP address to many private ones). You may instead have multiple public IP addresses and want each of those to map directly to multiple internal private IP addresses; this is known as many-to-many NAT. In this way, internal PCs are addressable directly from outside, but on a public IP address rather than their actual internal IP address. Multi-NAT allows this - your ADSL router will allow you to build a table of which public IP address maps to which internal IP client address. DSL services for business users are largely sold as multi-user packages - i.e., designed to meet the broadband needs of 2-25 users on a local area network. (Most residential DSL services are designated for single-user use, although in theory, with some competent technical tweaking, more than one PC can also access them). 'Multi-user' can - and often is - confused with the number of IP addresses supplied as part of a service provider's package, and relates to issues included (or excluded) in individual Providers' terms and conditions.\"
 

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