BSNL Broadband: Port Forwarding In Wa1003a Modem/router

bsnluser

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To do port forwarding, you must first decide what ports you want forwarded to which machine. Suppose your machine's IP address is 192.168.1.20 (It is best to give this machine a static IP address) and you want to forward VNC ports to it.1. Make sure that the WA1003a modem/router is in pppoe mode.2. Go to Advanced->LAN Clients. Add your machine as a static client. You need to enter the IP address of the machine, mac address of the machine's LAN card, and the machine's name.3. Go to Advanced->Port Forwarding.4. Select the machine to which you want to forward the ports to (in our example, it is 192.168.1.20).5. Next, from the radio buttons on the left side of this configuration web page, select the application for which you want to forward the ports. Example: to forward VNC ports, click on the Apps radio button, then select VNC from the application that are listed in the table, then click on Add button on the right hand side of this table. To see which ports are being forwarded, click on View button at the bottom of the table.6. Click Apply button.7. Go to Tools->System Commands (or something like this). Then click on "Save Settings" (or Save ALL) and then on Restart to save the settings and to restart the modem.Of course, for this to work, if you have any firewall on the machine to which you are forwarding the ports, you must allow the connections on those ports. In Zone Alarm for example, you must have allowed VNC to access the internet and to act as a server for the above example to work.If you want to port forward your own custom ports, you can specify those using the "User" radion button in the Port Forwarding page of the WA1003a configuration.GL.
 

bsnluser

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QUOTE(suprobhat @ Mar 31 2007, 03:18 PM) [snapback]85555[/snapback]
Hello bsnluser

Thank you for this guide.
What exactly do you mean by "to which machine"?
I would like to forward ports used by my torrent clients. So what IP should I choose?[/b]

First, understand that your modem/router is the connection between the whole of internet and your private home network or your private local area network (LAN). Next, understand that in a computer network, each computer must have an IP address (it is more detailed than this, but this statement will suffice for our current purposes). When your modem is working, it gets a "public IP address", which is the address by which your modem is known to the whole of internet. However, your LAN has "private IP address" range. For example, lets assume you connect two computers somehow to the LAN side of your modem. Your modem's external IP address will be the public IP address, given by BSNL. But your two computers will have IP address which are private (for example, one may be 192.168.1.10 and other may be 192.168.1.12).

Somebody "looking" at your computer from the internet will only see your public IP address. It is something like a building. Externally, you see only its main entrance, but once you go into the building, you can enter other doors into various rooms. That main entrance is same as your modem's public IP address, and those internal rooms are same as your home computers.

Now, when information arrives to your modem's public IP address from the internet, the modem must know where to send that information to your LAN computers. If you have two, and the information coming is for bittorrent data, your modem must know which of the two computers to send that information to.

To clarify this to the modem, you forward ports from your modems public address to one of your LAN computers. For example, assume both of your computers are running bittorrent clients on ports 60090. In your modem, you will have to separate the traffic for both of these. For example, you can tell your modem to forward all information coming to its (modem's) 60090 port to the 60090 port of Computer1. And to forward all information coming to its (modem's) port 60091 to port 60090 port of Compute2. Then modem's router part keep track of all the traffic coming to and from the two computers.

All the above is valid if your modem is working in pppoe mode. In this mode, your modem gets the public IP address and you can connect multiple computers in your LAN to share that internet connection.

The other choice is to use your modem in bridge mode. In this mode, the modem acts as a "bridge" and your computer gets the public IP address! For all practical purposes, your computer is connected to the internet directly (it is not on LAN anymore). The advantage of this mode is you don't need to do portfarding in the modem (actually, you can't in this mode). The disadvantage, however, is that you can then not share your connected with multiple computers.

Hope this helps in understanding all this.
 

bsnluser

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QUOTE(suprobhat @ Apr 1 2007, 07:50 PM) [snapback]85740[/snapback]
1. How do I switch to bridge mode?[/b]

This is given in the Wa1003a's manual and in many posts in this forum. Do a search. This might help too:
www.bangaloretelecom.com/dataone/WA1003A.doc


QUOTE(suprobhat @ Apr 1 2007, 07:50 PM) [snapback]85740[/snapback]
2.

Do you mean that I can not upload the data that I am downloading using my torrent client to the other peers?[/b]

No. I mean that multiple computers in your LAN cannot browse the internet through your modem. But since you have only one computer connected to the modem, you do not need to worry about this.

QUOTE(suprobhat @ Apr 1 2007, 07:50 PM) [snapback]85740[/snapback]
3. I have created custom rules successfully in the user section of Advanced> Port Forward of my router. But unfortunately as I try to forward port I always get an error in a red rectangular box that \"Error Found in Page\".

Please refer to this screen shot:

http://img455.imageshack.us/my.php?image=untitledkf8.jpg[/b]

First, make sure your modem is working in pppoe mode. Port forwarding is possible only in this mode. One way to check is to open the command terminal in your computer (I am assuming you are using Windows), and give the following command:
ipconfig

If the output of this command says that your computer has an IP address of something like 192.168.x.y, then your modem is working in pppoe mode. However, if your computer's IP address is something like 59.x.y.z (i.e. if the IP is NOT something like 192.168.x.y),
then your modem is working in bridge mode -- in bridge mode, you cannot forward ports.
 


bsnluser

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QUOTE(suprobhat @ Apr 3 2007, 12:39 AM) [snapback]85880[/snapback]
1. do I need to change anyting else in the router as I have changed from Bridge Mode to PPPoE mode?[/b]

No. You may need to change/add rules for port forwarding though.

QUOTE(suprobhat @ Apr 3 2007, 12:39 AM) [snapback]85880[/snapback]
2. I can not use the dialing option which I used to connect to the net while the router was in the bridge mode. Now whenever i urn on my router I am connected. As I have Data Transfer limit of 2.5GB per month, I would lke to manually connect to the net, how can it be done?[/b]


In PPPoE mode, just switch off your modem and you are offline! And switch it on and you are online. The other method is to open modem's configuration in your web browser and disconnect/reconnect your modem from there (I think this is in Status page or some such place).
 

bsnluser

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Messages
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QUOTE(suprobhat @ Apr 4 2007, 06:00 PM) [snapback]86150[/snapback]
Could you please be kind to clear my following doubts?
1. Is PPPoE mode gives better speed [for example Torrent downloading] over the Bridge mode?[/b]

For all practical purposes, it should not matter at all.

QUOTE(suprobhat @ Apr 4 2007, 06:00 PM) [snapback]86150[/snapback]
2. As you know that we only get free data transfer during 2 am to 8 am everyday. But I generally do not remain awake during that hour of night. So What I do is that I put my in "STANDBY" mode and schedule it to connect after 2am resuming from standby. The only thing is that I have to keep my Router turned on. So in PPPoE mode if I keep my Router on but the PC is in Standby mode, will there be any data transfer?[/b]

No, if your computer is in standby mode, and *no other* computer is connected to your router, no data transfer should occur. But note that if you do not have proper encryption in your wireless router, a third person with a wireless card can start using your internet connection without your knowledge (if your router is ON). So if you plan to keep your router on, make sure you have strong wireless encryption (WPA), or better still, if you don't need wireless, just disable the wireless part of your router.
 

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