Accessing Another Pc On The Same Lan

amitdasmarty

Newbie
Messages
29
HI , I have a wireess LAN set up and I connect using 2 laptops. I tried accessing the other laptop just by simply typing it's IP address , But I guess its not that simple and requires some tweak somewhere..Both Laptops get their IP address from a common DHCP server and are in the same domain.ANy idea on how I can access one laptop from the other ? ThanksAmit :rolleyes:
 

bsnluser

Regular
Regulars
Messages
138
QUOTE(amitdasmarty @ Dec 17 2006, 10:09 PM) [snapback]71122[/snapback]
HI ,

I have a wireess LAN set up and I connect using 2 laptops. I tried accessing the other laptop just by simply typing it's IP address , But I guess its not that simple and requires some tweak somewhere..

Both Laptops get their IP address from a common DHCP server and are in the same domain.

ANy idea on how I can access one laptop from the other ?
Thanks
Amit :rolleyes:
[/b]

I will assume you are new to this networking stuff. Lets take an example of a phone call. If you call a remote phone number, it rings and can be answered by a person at that location. The point to note is that a person must be there to pick up the phone and answer it.

Networking in computers is similar. Let us say you have two computers on your LAN: CompA and CompB. If you want to connect from CompA to CompB, you need to "call" CompB from CompA. But there must be something on CompB that can answer that "call". For example, in case you "call" a webpage on a remote computer, the remote computer must have a webserver. A webserver "answers" calls for webpages. In case you "call" to see a folder on a remote computer, that remote computer must have a fileserver installed and running. A fireserver answers queries regarding files and folders. This explanation is pretty simplistic, but I hope it explains what is going on.

Now, to make a phone call, you need an active phone with a phone number and the remote phone must also be active and must have a phone number (but of course). Similarly, in computer networks, you must have the computers on a network domain (which you do) and each computer must have a unique IP address (which also you do). In addition to IP addresses, it is a good idea to give names to your computers.

In your case, since your computers are getting their IP adresses from a router, your networking should be working fine (recalling our telephone analogy, the telephones are active and have numbers associated with them). The only thing left to do is to decide what kind of calls to make. Note that you must know either the name of the computers or its IP address (knowing the IP address always works).

The most common thing people do in home networks (running Windows) is to share folders or printers. It is quite easy to do this. The best way to see how this is done is to look at a webpage that explains this. Search google to "how to setup file sharing in Windows XP" gave many results. Example, see this page:
http://www.geekgirls.com/windowsxp_home_network.htm


Good luck.
 



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