How are you guys planning on using your Hayai connections?

baxilone

Newbie
[OP]
Aug 7, 2011
38
0
I thought it might be interesting to find out what you guys have planned, for when you finally get Hayai. I'm presuming many are going to be using up (a large proportion of) their bandwidth with downloads of DVDs, Bluray movies and the like, some are going to be overdosing on youtube, others will be using gameservers (or starting their own?), but I'd really like to know what else you guys are thinking/ dreaming of. Just seeing a figure like 1 gbps on paper, or for that matter even 100 mbps, doesn't tell you anything about how amazingly fast it is, till you get down to using it. So maybe many of us are going to find some cool things to do once we start using the service, and the initial euphoria and speed-high settles in. I've been using seedboxes recently, and the ones I'm on now are on 1gbit pipes. I've got up to 90 MB/s (720 mbit) speeds downloading and close to 40 MB/s uploading. Its incredible how fast these are, and I've only fully understood this after using them. Bluray films come down in a few minutes (if there are other fast connections / seedboxes seeding), and if you're the kind that uses file hosts like -- link removed --, well, getting a 1 gb file down just took me less than a minute. All this has helped me get a feel for the kind of speeds we're talking about with Hayai. But there are many minuses to seedboxing. There are limits to the sites you can use, and you have to get the files down to your home computer through ftp and this is totally dependent on your home connection speed......uhh, enough said. So obviously, this is going to be one of the things, getting huge files down faster, improving ratios on private trackers and all that. But I'm more interested in trying to imagine what else is possible with it. I think mgcarley asked something similar in some other thread, but I thought this deserves a thread on its own. Maybe you have some ideas for us too, mgc? What do you usually do with such speeds? :)I'm also thinking more along the lines of how this might be used in fields like medicine, development etc., though this might have to wait till the network is much more widespread.Also, as a sidenote, I just noticed that the 1 gbps plan has a soft FUP of 500 gb. As mentioned above, I'm on 1 gbit servers, and I've found that I can get through that much (download and upload) in around 3-4 days, and even sooner if there are things like freeleeches on somewhere. Don't you think its a little on the lower side....maybe something like 1 tb might do it, seeing as how its easy to upload ~200 gigs in a day on such connections.
 

mehrotra.akash

Regular
Regulars
May 17, 2008
915
6
about the last point, from what I understood,The connection is NOT meant to be maxxed out at all.Flat rate plans are basically Data based plans, but with a bill limit guarantee.If you exceed te usage sometimes, you dont have to pay extra
 

amitnsonu

Regular
Regulars
Apr 23, 2010
589
48
means hayai BB finally launched !!!where ?
 


mehrotra.akash

Regular
Regulars
May 17, 2008
915
6
means hayai BB finally launched !!!

where ?

Only the tentative plans have been launched(long back), not the network itself
 

baxilone

Newbie
[OP]
Aug 7, 2011
38
0
I know you're not expected to max out your connection, and that you're not asked to pay extra if you somehow happen to cross the line. The point I was trying to make is just how easy it is to cross the line, esp. at higher speeds, say 1 gbps, and if you happen to mostly use it at torrent sites that are saturated with seedbox swarms. I know there is a realistic limit to how much you can possibly use of what you download, and this might be the limiting factor for most people. If you were able to download say 500 gb of material with the 1 gbps plan, you'd still need months, or maybe even years to use all of it, not to mention the crazy regularity with which you'd be investing in external HDDs. :)However, I was trying to compare it with seedbox services, which I guess are different as they're tailor-made for heavy torrenting. One of the servers I subscribe to, which allows up to 1 gbps download and 300 mbit upload, has a monthly upload cap of 5 TB, and though I don't usually reach it, I almost always get at least halfway there. I know most of you are thinking what I'm doing with downloads of over 2-3 TB a month. Well, most of this is stuff I have no use for...its just thrown in the seedbox to get me upload buffers on difficult sites, so I can then chill and grab whatever I want. I download maybe 10% of it to my home computer for personal consumption :)I guess its not very fair to compare Hayai with these seedbox servers, as most of the users might never even come close to the FUPs suggested, and obviously, a service such as this has to consider the average usage when it decides things like FUP, but it might be nice if there was a way to buy additional data on flat rate plans for heavy users. If I find the FUP on the 100 or 200 mbps too limiting, I can upgrade to a higher plan, but what do I do if I find the FUP on the 1 gbps plan limiting?
 


mgcarley

Founder, Hayai Broadband
Regulars
Jun 22, 2009
6,301
113
I thought it might be interesting to find out what you guys have planned, for when you finally get Hayai.

I'm presuming many are going to be using up (a large proportion of) their bandwidth with downloads of DVDs, Bluray movies and the like, some are going to be overdosing on youtube, others will be using gameservers (or starting their own?), but I'd really like to know what else you guys are thinking/ dreaming of. Just seeing a figure like 1 gbps on paper, or for that matter even 100 mbps, doesn't tell you anything about how amazingly fast it is, till you get down to using it. So maybe many of us are going to find some cool things to do once we start using the service, and the initial euphoria and speed-high settles in.

I've been using seedboxes recently, and the ones I'm on now are on 1gbit pipes. I've got up to 90 MB/s (720 mbit) speeds downloading and close to 40 MB/s uploading. Its incredible how fast these are, and I've only fully understood this after using them. Bluray films come down in a few minutes (if there are other fast connections / seedboxes seeding), and if you're the kind that uses file hosts like -- link removed --, well, getting a 1 gb file down just took me less than a minute. All this has helped me get a feel for the kind of speeds we're talking about with Hayai.

But there are many minuses to seedboxing. There are limits to the sites you can use, and you have to get the files down to your home computer through ftp and this is totally dependent on your home connection speed......uhh, enough said.

This question was actually already asked by me: http://broadbandforum.in/broadband-in-india/62837-would-you-do-100mbit-s/

So obviously, this is going to be one of the things, getting huge files down faster, improving ratios on private trackers and all that. But I'm more interested in trying to imagine what else is possible with it. I think mgcarley asked something similar in some other thread, but I thought this deserves a thread on its own. Maybe you have some ideas for us too, mgc? What do you usually do with such speeds? :)

Nothing spectacular, really. Occasionally I download stuff or what streamed content. I've downloaded 400MB in the last 12 hours and uploaded 1.3GB, but on some days that could be vastly different. I can download (or upload) 10GB in minutes if I want to, but I know that I don't have to do that every hour of every day - I have a connection that is there when I need it, and it's sufficiently fast that my content comes down quickly enough to satisfy my need for immediate satisfaction.

Where you would set a movie downloading overnight, I would set it downloading, make a pot of chai or coffee, come back and it would be nearly ready if not completed. When it's not downloading then the rest of the time it sits idly waiting for me to do the next thing. The Internet isn't going to go away - it'll still be there tomorrow, so I don't have to download all of it at once.

I'm also thinking more along the lines of how this might be used in fields like medicine, development etc., though this might have to wait till the network is much more widespread.

Also, as a sidenote, I just noticed that the 1 gbps plan has a soft FUP of 500 gb. As mentioned above, I'm on 1 gbit servers, and I've found that I can get through that much (download and upload) in around 3-4 days, and even sooner if there are things like freeleeches on somewhere. Don't you think its a little on the lower side....maybe something like 1 tb might do it, seeing as how its easy to upload ~200 gigs in a day on such connections.

How many terabytes of hard drives have you got? I've got about 4.3TB at my place, about 60-70% full. Do I go out and buy another hard drive every month? No. Every other month? No. Every 6 months... yeah, maybe. Have I even looked at 100% of the content which I've downloaded? Hell no. Maybe 50-60% of it if I'm lucky (and even that may be a result of me leaving things playing overnight).

In short: what you *can* pull down on a 1Gbit/s connection versus what you *will* pull down on such a connection is often quite a different story, if for no other reason than practicality. Sure, you might use 400+GB in a couple of days, but chances are that you're not going to download too much over the next 20 days as you actually go through and watch the movie/play the game/listen to the music/etc, and especially considering that next month, the process would be repeated again - you don't have to download the entire Internet at once, you know ;)

But even with the super high quality formats that are out (which most people don't even have the hardware to take advantage of anyway), anyone with a life can only spend so much time sitting on their ass watching movies anyway, so there's an upper limit there somewhere as to what you'd end up using in a month. Let's say you download 20x 25GB BR Rips a month - that's "only" 500GB. 20x hour-long TV shows at around 1.5GB each, total 530GB. Piles of music (let's be generous and say 50GB - at 320kbit/s quality that's still 355 hours worth). 1 or 2 new games a month over steam: total maybe another 20GB. We've barely breached 600GB total (without having segregated the difference between HZ traffic and regular Internet traffic) and now everyone can sit here wondering: where are you going to get the time to consume all this content?

All in all, it's going to take multiple people in the same household each downloading this much content before that household would be considered to be "abusing" the network. As of now, the FUPs are what they are, however that's not to say that they wouldn't change for the better after some time as our costs come down thanks to volume.

about the last point, from what I understood,
The connection is NOT meant to be maxxed out at all.
Flat rate plans are basically Data based plans, but with a bill limit guarantee.
If you exceed te usage sometimes, you dont have to pay extra

No, those would be the post-paid data plans.

The flat-rate plans just give an idea as to what might be considered fair. Whether we do anything if the FUP is crossed depends on the conditions of the network at the time - we may choose to shape certain traffic to ease congestion if it happened so that more time-critical things didn't get affected (VOIP, Gaming and so on), or it may also be nothing. As per the FAQs, data plans would not be subjected to any kind of shaping which is a fairly fundamental difference.
 

manu1991

Ancient Philospher
Regulars
Dec 9, 2006
7,331
1,425
Delhi
As mgcarley pointed out, there is only so much information you can absorb. When i rented a seedbox for 3 months, i went ballistic. Upped 1-2 tb in 6-7 torrent sites. I use only 2 of them now and the others have been deleted due to inactivity. If I have a 1 gbps connection, why would I download movies, I will directly stream them(hopefully legally at reasonable prices) whenever i want.
 

mgcarley

Founder, Hayai Broadband
Regulars
Jun 22, 2009
6,301
113
I know you're not expected to max out your connection, and that you're not asked to pay extra if you somehow happen to cross the line. The point I was trying to make is just how easy it is to cross the line, esp. at higher speeds, say 1 gbps, and if you happen to mostly use it at torrent sites that are saturated with seedbox swarms. I know there is a realistic limit to how much you can possibly use of what you download, and this might be the limiting factor for most people. If you were able to download say 500 gb of material with the 1 gbps plan, you'd still need months, or maybe even years to use all of it, not to mention the crazy regularity with which you'd be investing in external HDDs. :)

However, I was trying to compare it with seedbox services, which I guess are different as they're tailor-made for heavy torrenting. One of the servers I subscribe to, which allows up to 1 gbps download and 300 mbit upload, has a monthly upload cap of 5 TB, and though I don't usually reach it, I almost always get at least halfway there. I know most of you are thinking what I'm doing with downloads of over 2-3 TB a month. Well, most of this is stuff I have no use for...its just thrown in the seedbox to get me upload buffers on difficult sites, so I can then chill and grab whatever I want. I download maybe 10% of it to my home computer for personal consumption :)

These seedboxes are most often located in Europe, where bandwidth is super cheap and infrastructure is readily available (and cheap) - 10Gbit/s connection costs maybe 1200 euros a month and moreover, these things are located in data centers which have so much bandwidth going in to them it's not even funny - not to mention that half the time, the seedboxes are sharing information amongst themselves anyway! Here... good luck finding anything anywhere near that price.

Besides; your actual consumption works out to be only about 250-300GB anyway - do you get through all of that in a month? If so, what would happen if that volume were to double? Could you realistically handle it then?

I guess its not very fair to compare Hayai with these seedbox servers, as most of the users might never even come close to the FUPs suggested, and obviously, a service such as this has to consider the average usage when it decides things like FUP, but it might be nice if there was a way to buy additional data on flat rate plans for heavy users.

There is. The data plans themselves are not priced particularly differently from the Flat-Rate plans and respective FUPs.

Moreover, if you use the Hayai torrent tracker, then bandwidth between users or from certain servers is not counted and as such you could easily go in to downloading Terabytes from other Hayai customers if you wanted to without having to worry about the FUP.

If I find the FUP on the 100 or 200 mbps too limiting, I can upgrade to a higher plan, but what do I do if I find the FUP on the 1 gbps plan limiting?

Buy a data plan instead. As mentioned above, it's not priced very differently to the flat-rate plans (all things considered). Or perhaps even move over to a small business plan. Or wait for us to increase the FUP as our volume discounts come in to effect or if all else fails, ask us really nicely if you can use say 1TB a month instead ;)
 

baxilone

Newbie
[OP]
Aug 7, 2011
38
0
This question was actually already asked by me: http://broadbandforum.in/broadband-in-india/62837-would-you-do-100mbit-s/

Oh, my bad I missed this one. Will check it out now.


Nothing spectacular, really. Occasionally I download stuff or what streamed content. I've downloaded 400MB in the last 12 hours and uploaded 1.3GB, but on some days that could be vastly different. I can download (or upload) 10GB in minutes if I want to, but I know that I don't have to do that every hour of every day - I have a connection that is there when I need it, and it's sufficiently fast that my content comes down quickly enough to satisfy my need for immediate satisfaction.

Where you would set a movie downloading overnight, I would set it downloading, make a pot of chai or coffee, come back and it would be nearly ready if not completed. When it's not downloading then the rest of the time it sits idly waiting for me to do the next thing. The Internet isn't going to go away - it'll still be there tomorrow, so I don't have to download all of it at once.

That's exactly what I do as well, since I got on seeedboxes. Only difference being, and this is key, I can't just come back after my chai and watch the movie that just came down, as its still only on my box, and will take 'x' hours before it transfers to my home computer :)

Otherwise, the experiential aspect of it is quite similar. I was really frenzied the first few days, but now I hardly ever use my box for more than 2-3 hours a day, and still manage to get all the stuff and the buffer I'll ever need.

How many terabytes of hard drives have you got? I've got about 4.3TB at my place, about 60-70% full. Do I go out and buy another hard drive every month? No. Every other month? No. Every 6 months... yeah, maybe. Have I even looked at 100% of the content which I've downloaded? Hell no. Maybe 50-60% of it if I'm lucky (and even that may be a result of me leaving things playing overnight).

In short: what you *can* pull down on a 1Gbit/s connection versus what you *will* pull down on such a connection is often quite a different story, if for no other reason than practicality. Sure, you might use 400+GB in a couple of days, but chances are that you're not going to download too much over the next 20 days as you actually go through and watch the movie/play the game/listen to the music/etc, and especially considering that next month, the process would be repeated again - you don't have to download the entire Internet at once, you know ;)

But even with the super high quality formats that are out (which most people don't even have the hardware to take advantage of anyway), anyone with a life can only spend so much time sitting on their ass watching movies anyway, so there's an upper limit there somewhere as to what you'd end up using in a month. Let's say you download 20x 25GB BR Rips a month - that's "only" 500GB. 20x hour-long TV shows at around 1.5GB each, total 530GB. Piles of music (let's be generous and say 50GB - at 320kbit/s quality that's still 355 hours worth). 1 or 2 new games a month over steam: total maybe another 20GB. We've barely breached 600GB total (without having segregated the difference between HZ traffic and regular Internet traffic) and now everyone can sit here wondering: where are you going to get the time to consume all this content?

All in all, it's going to take multiple people in the same household each downloading this much content before that household would be considered to be "abusing" the network. As of now, the FUPs are what they are, however that's not to say that they wouldn't change for the better after some time as our costs come down thanks to volume.


I totally agree, and this is pretty much what I wrote as well. There's a hard reality check that hits you a few days/weeks into using a superfast connection, and you ultimately realize you already have more than you're ever going to have the time to watch/use. But this is IF you're interested in watching/using everything you're downloading. Like I said, I'm not, and I usually download all kinds of sundry stuff onto my box just to let it upload for some time and get me some buffer. I'll use this buffer later to get stuff I really want, stuff which usually won't seed back to give me any ratio once I've grabbed it.

So essentially, I think I was just ranting about how it might not be possible to use Hayai in the same way as I use my boxes, to create buffer to use whenever I need it. I grabbed a ~30 gb film yesterday and seeded for around 9 hours to get a 5+ ratio....that's already 150 gb uploaded on that file.

In simpler words, I guess I'm wrong in expecting Hayai to replace my seedbox. :)