Two Lan Cards At Once?

amogh_gulwady

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Dec 17, 2004
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I want to take a ADSL conenction, while i still want to keep my LAN card for the LAN. Is it possible for me two configure to separate NICs with different IP settings and all that? I am averse to using the USB port since going through the posts, the obvious opinion is that USB sucks.Cheers,Amogh :)
 

seshu

Listener
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Mar 31, 2006
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^ Yes , it should be possible if your mother board can support the two NIC s simultaneously . Just do a net search with "two""NIC" "computer" as keywords & check some of the results ...
 

aniketvb

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Oct 2, 2005
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it will work fine ..no problems..just you shd have enuf pci slots!
 


bsnluser

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Jul 25, 2006
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QUOTE(amogh_gulwady @ Aug 1 2006, 06:38 PM) [snapback]57214[/snapback]
I want to take a ADSL conenction, while i still want to keep my LAN card for the LAN. Is it possible for me two configure to separate NICs with different IP settings and all that? I am averse to using the USB port since going through the posts, the obvious opinion is that USB sucks.

Cheers,
Amogh :)
[/b]

Assuming you have two network cards already in the computer, it is quite easy to make them work. Just make sure that the NICs are in different subnets. Lets do an example. Assume your ADSL modem's LAN network is 192.168.0.0 and that you modem's LAN ip address is 192.168.0.1. Also assume that *your* LAN network, beyond this computer (or other computers in your nework which are sharing your internet connection through this computer of yours) are on 192.168.1.0 network. Then, you can have the two NICs configured in this way:

Nic1:
IP: 192.168.0.10
subnet: 255.255.255.0
Gateway: 192.168.0.1
Network: 192.168.0.0
DNS: , , etc.

Nic2:
IP: 192.168.1.20
subnet: 255.255.255.0
Network: 192.168.1.0
gateway:
DNS: , , etc.


Note that Nic1 is on 192.168.0.x subnet and Nic2 is on 192.168.1.x subnet. You will, of course, need to modify the above if your setup is different.

In Windoze, you need to set up one of the Nics as Internet NIC (in our example, that would Nic1) and the other as Local NIC.

For all I know (if your modem is in bridge mode), you need not to give any IP adress to your Nic1 (the one connected to the ADSL modem) at all. It doesn't really matter; if needed (and if you are in Windoze), your OS will give an IP to the card automatically. But IMHO, this is not a good idea. It is better to have things fixed and known. So the best option is keep Nic1 on the same subnet as the ADSL modem's LAN port.

Another little note, In Windoze, even if you keep both the cards on the same subnet (e.g. 192.168.0.x), your network *may* still work (I mainly use Linux, so not sure about this). But this is not right if you want to talk to the two subnets. The two Nics must be on different subnets.

hope this helps,
but feel free to ask if you have more questions.
 


amogh_gulwady

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Dec 17, 2004
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Thanks a lot bsnluser, I shall try it out and let you know. Are you a network specialist, perchance? (I am a mechie, I do not know the technical terms ;) )
 

bsnluser

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Jul 25, 2006
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QUOTE(amogh_gulwady @ Aug 2 2006, 06:01 PM) [snapback]57336[/snapback]
Thanks a lot bsnluser, I shall try it out and let you know. Are you a network specialist, perchance? (I am a mechie, I do not know the technical terms ;) )
[/b]

Well, I am not a "specialist" but I do have some networking knowledge. I have my own home network, setup from scratch. I have an ADSL connection, modem is connected to an old PIII machine which is running Debian Linux and acts as a router (it has two Nics). I have setup iptables based firewall on the Debian computer (called Debian router). I also run a webserver on one of my internal computers (also running Debian).

If you are not sure with any term I explained in my earlier post, feel free to ask here.

Good luck.
 

deeps

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Jul 11, 2006
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HiI think a much better and simpler method, would be to get an ADSL router. That way, only the pc that wants to access the internet has to be on. The problem with connecting the modem up to one pc, and sharing the connection from there, is that the main pc must be on all the time. Pay the extra $$$'s when buying your modem, and get a 4 port one. It will make things much easier and simplr, and frees up a pci port :)
 

bsnluser

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Jul 25, 2006
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QUOTE(deeps @ Aug 2 2006, 10:12 PM) [snapback]57385[/snapback]
Hi

I think a much better and simpler method, would be to get an ADSL router. That way, only the pc that wants to access the internet has to be on.
[/b]

"Better" ... well that depends on a user's needs.


QUOTE(deeps @ Aug 2 2006, 10:12 PM) [snapback]57385[/snapback]
The problem with connecting the modem up to one pc, and sharing the connection from there, is that the main pc must be on all the time.
[/b]

Yes, that is true, the computer needs to be ON for the time during which the connection is needed for any PC on the LAN.


QUOTE(deeps @ Aug 2 2006, 10:12 PM) [snapback]57385[/snapback]
Pay the extra $$$'s when buying your modem, and get a 4 port one. It will make things much easier and simplr, and frees up a pci port :)
[/b]

I did that for quite a while (using a US Robotics router). But then I realized that these kind of consumer grade routers only have limited rules to forward ports to internal servers. Usually you can forward and setup rules which amount no more than 20 in number.

I then chose to set up a PC as a router. Now I have virtually unlimited number rules that I can set. Actually, I can now control the connections to my heart's content :)